Lorenzo Garcia, Jr.

Associate Professor of Classics

Photo: Lorenzo Garcia, Jr.

Email: lfgarcia@unm.edu
Phone: 505 277-4771
Fax: (505) 277-3599
Office: 351C

Personal Statement:

Lorenzo is currently working on articles on the political dimensions of Ovid’s Ars Amatoria, The semiotics of food in Petronius’ Cena Trimalchionis, and gift exchange in Book 4 of Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War. He is also working on revising his dissertation into two monograph projects: one on time and the forces of decay in The Iliad, and one applying film practice and theory to a reading of the "visual" elements in the Homeric poems.

Educational History:

2007, Ph.D., in Classics, University of California, Los Angeles.

Dissertation:
Homeric Temporalities: Simultaneity, Sequence, and Duration in the Iliad,directed by Dr. Ann L. T. Bergren.

2002, M.A., in Classics, University of California, Los Angeles.

2000, M.A., in Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.

Master’s Thesis:
Reading Plato Reading Homer: Intertextual Studies in Plato and Homer, directed by Dr. Monica Cyrino.

1997, Certificate of Completion, Ancient Greek Summer Intensive Course, University of Texas, Austin.

1996, B.A., in Liberal Arts, St. John’s College, Santa Fe, NM.

Honors Thesis:
Reading and Imitation: An Analytic and Interpretive Study of Don Quixote, directed by Dr. Sally Dunn.

Research Interests:

Homeric epic, early Greek poetics, mythology, narratology, film theory, phenomenology, and psychology

Selected Publications:

Books

Homeric Durability: Telling Time in the Iliad. Washington DC: Center for Hellenic Studies/Harvard University Press, February 2013
Available: http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674073234

Articles

  • “G. W. Pabst’s Hesiodic Myth of Sex in Die Büchse der Pandora (1929).” In M. Cyrino, ed., Screening Love and Sex in the Ancient World. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 11-24.
  • “Violated Economies: Iliadic Exchange in Robert D. Webb’s White Feather (1955).” Classical and Modern Literature 29.2 (forthcoming). (approx. 35 pages).

Selected Conference Presentations:

  • “Death from Behind: Achilles and the Orientation of the Future.” Classical Association of the Middle-West and South, Iowa City, IA (April 2013).
  • “The Aristophanic Tragicomedy of Hedwig and the Angry Inch (2001).” The 2012 Film & History Conference: MYTHOS: Screening Classical Mythology on Film and Television. Milwaukee, WI (September 2012).
  • “Human and Divine Temporalities in the Iliad.” Classical Association of the Middle-West and South, Baton Rouge, LA (April 2012).
  • “Homer and the Monuments Revisited.” Classical Association of the Middle-West and South, Grand Rapids, MI (April 2011).
  • “G. W. Pabst’s Hesiodic Myth of Sex in Die Büchse der Pandora (1929).” The 2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television, Milwaukee, WI (November 2010).
  • “Trimalchio as Cultural Theorist: The Semiotics of Ambition in the Cena Trimalchionis.” Classical Association of the Middle-West and South, Oklahoma City, OK (March 2010).
  • “Reading a Text Like a Film: Tracing Cinematic Conventions within Ancient Literature.” Classical Association of the Middle-West and South, Minneapolis, MN (April 2009).
  • “Violated Economies: Iliadic Exchange in Robert D. Webb’s White Feather (1955).” Classical Association of the Middle-West and South, Tucson, AZ (April 2008).
  • “Telling Time in the Iliad: The Decay of Ships and the Semantics of ‘Rotting.’” American Philological Association, Chicago, IL (January 2008).
  • "Mise en scène, Frame, Shot: Homer’s‘Focalization.’” Homer and His Worlds, Graduate Student Conference, New York University (March 2007).
  • “Homeric Montage: Cinematic Simultaneity in the Iliad.” American Philological Association, San Diego, CA (January 2007).
  • “A Platonic Pseudology: Re–examining the Hippias Minor.” Classical Association of the Middle-West and South, Provo, UT (April 2001).

Teaching Interests:

  • Early Greek Poetry
  • Greek Literary Culture
  • Film Theory
  • Rhetoric

Representative Courses:

  • CLST 204 - Ancient Greek Civilization
  • CLST 334 - Homeric Cinematography
  • CLST 334 - Homer, Hesiod, and the Near East
  • GREEK 301-302 - Advanced Greek (Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, Plato, Isocrates)
  • LATIN 303-304 - Advanced Latin (Catullus, Ovid, Pliny the Younger, Petronius, Apuleius)

Other Information:

  • Classical Association of the Middle West and South

Vice-President of the Rocky Mountain Region, 2013-.
Vice-President of the state of New Mexico, 2007-2012.

  • Committee for the Promotion of Latin

Vice-President for the state of New Mexico, 2007-2012.

  • UNM, Dept. of Foreign Languages and Literatures

Classics Graduate Studies Advisor, 2009-.
Graduate Affairs Committee, 2009-.